Week of August 19, 2012

In November we go to the polls again to vote for leadership in our country.  For a number of years now when there is election for the President our Catholic Bishops have issued a statement called Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship to share Catholic teaching on the role of faith and conscience in political life.  This statement does not offer a voter’s guide, scorecard of issues, or direction on how to vote.  It applies Catholic moral principles to a range of important issues and warns against misguided appeals to “conscience” to ignore fundamental moral claims, to reduce Catholic moral concerns to one or two matters, or to justify choices simply to advance partisan, ideological, or personal interests. It does not offer a quantitative listing of issues for equal consideration, but outlines and makes important distinctions among moral issues acknowledging that some involve the clear obligation to oppose intrinsic evils which can never be justified and that others require action to pursue justice and promote the common good. In short, it calls Catholics to form their consciences in the light of their Catholic faith and to bring our moral principles to the debate and decisions about
candidates and issues.

The moral and human challenges outlined in the second half of Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship remain pressing national issues. In particular, the Bishop’s Conference is focused on several current and fundamental problems, some involving opposition to intrinsic evils and others raising serious moral questions:

  •  Continuing destruction of unborn children through abortion and other threats to the lives and dignity of others who are vulnerable, sick, or unwanted;
  • Renewed efforts to force Catholic ministries—in health care, education, and social services—to violate their consciences or stop serving those in need;
  • Intensifying efforts to redefine marriage and enact measures which
    undermine marriage as the permanent, faithful, and fruitful union of one man and one woman and a fundamental moral and social institution essential to the common good;
  • An economic crisis which has devastated lives and livelihoods, increasing national and global unemployment, poverty, and hunger; increasing deficits and debt and the duty to respond in ways which protect those who are poor and vulnerable as well as future generations;
  • The failure to repair a broken immigration system with comprehensive measures that promote true respect for law, protect the human rights and dignity of immigrants and refugees, recognize their contributions to our
    nation, keep families together, and advance the common good;

Wars, terror, and violence which raise serious moral questions on the use of force and its human and moral costs in a dangerous world, particularly the absence of justice, security, and peace in the Holy Land and throughout the Middle East.

In coming articles I will be using the bishops’ statement to inform us on the Catholic Church’s teaching on these issues.

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